Founders Day - 2020 

We know homeschooling and working from home comes with it's own challenges, that's why we are here to support you the best we can!

 

Join us each week for ready-made local virtual history lessons created for 4th - 5th graders (and beyond)!

 

Our weekly virtual programming can be used as a tool for teaching local history, complete with discussion questions that students could answer and submit online.  And, yes, we have included fun activities, so word searches and cross word puzzles are a part of each week’s lesson as well. 

WEEK 2

Highlighted Submissions

Patriots Rock & The Battle of Setauket

Short Answer Question 1

— Anderson P.

Age 9, Setauket, NY

"Striations are formed by glacial movement."

Week 3: The Setauket Village Green

 

The Setauket Village Green has been a meeting place and a community center since the first English settlers came here more than 350 years ago and founded the Town of Brookhaven. The agents for the settlers and the Setalcott leaders met here. The English settlers built their first combination meeting hall, church and school here. For almost 150 years this was the headquarters for the Town of Brookhaven. The business of the town was conducted here and the yearly voting for town leaders was held here. 

Brookhaven’s first schoolhouse was built six decades before the Revolutionary War on the Village Green where the Caroline Church Carriage Shed is today. During the war many Patriots who attended school here died fighting for independence, many others helped Washington win the revolution. 150 years later, in 1869, a new one-room schoolhouse was built in the center of the Village Green. It was expanded with two

The Setauket Village Green has been a meeting place and a community center since the first English settlers came here more than 350 years ago and founded the Town of Brookhaven. The agents for the settlers and the Setalcott leaders met here. The English settlers built their first combination meeting hall, church and school here. For almost 150 years this was the headquarters for the Town of Brookhaven. The business of the town was conducted here and the yearly voting for town leaders was held here.

 

Brookhaven’s first schoolhouse was built six decades before the Revolutionary War on the Village Green where the Caroline Church Carriage Shed is today. During the war many Patriots who attended school here died fighting for independence, many others helped Washington win the revolution. 150 years later, in 1869, a new one-room schoolhouse was built in the center of the Village Green. It was expanded with two stories in 1893 (pictured on the poster) as many immigrants came to Setauket to work. The diversity in the community is shown in the circa 1890 photograph of children on the side of the schoolhouse on the Setauket Village Green shown in the poster pictured here.   

From the 1850s to about 1905 a piano factory and then a rubber factory (pictured on the poster)  provided employment for residents and immigrants in our community. These workers, like their children, represented the diversity of our community. Residents and immigrants of European and African descent and immigrants from many European countries worked in the factories and lived in the “Chicken Hill” community that surrounded the factories. 

The large rock on the Village Green was added in 1921 to honor the Three Village area men who died in the first world war. A plaque to honor the men who died in in World War II was added in 1946. A new plaque honors the young man who died in Vietnam in 1969. The soldiers honored here were from families who immigrated to Setauket from England, Scotland, Ukraine (Russia), Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Ireland, Germany, France and Italy. The soldiers names are also listed on the poster pictured here.

QUESTIONS

Short Answer Questions

  1. Where do you think the Memorial Rock on Setauket Village Green originally came from? 

Discussion Questions: 

  1. Imagine attending a one room school.  By the time you finished school, you would have been with the same students for years!  What would you like about that and what wouldn’t you like?

  2. Many families moved to Setauket to work in the factories in our community. Did any of your ancestors immigrate to this country? Where were they from?  Ask your family to tell of your ancestor’s experiences as an immigrant in a strange new land. Did they bring any of their customs with them that you now enjoy?

  3. There are several memorials in our community that honor people who died.  The Memorial Rock on the Setauket Village Green has several plaques that honor veterans who died serving their country in four different wars. Have you ever attended the Memorial Day Parade in your community? Next time you are near a memorial, stop to read the plaques. Can you think of anything else we could do as a community to thank these men and women?

Submit your answers!
WORD SEARCH PUZZLES - (click images to download & print)
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Week 2: Patriot's Rock and the Battle of Setauket

 

Loyalist troops under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Richard Hewlett took possession of the Setauket Presbyterian Church on the Setauket Village Green. They desecrated the church, possibly going so far as to remove the pews and pulpit so they could stable their horses in the church building. They fortified the area around the building with an earthwork topped with sharpened wooden poles and placed bundles of branches along the top of the earthwork as protection from musket fire.  More sharpened poles were faced outward along the earthwork to repel a frontal attack and swivel guns were set in the window openings to fire down on attackers.


To capture the fort, Continental Army troops, under General Samuel Parsons, crossed Long Island Sound from Connecticut. Parsons had his artillery officer Lieutenant Caleb Brewster set up his cannon alongside the large rock on what was then part of the Village Green.

He sent a message to Hewlett demanding the surrender of the fort. Hewlett had sent a messenger for help to the British stationed at Huntington, and wished to play for time. He asked for half an hour to consult with his officers. Parsons, aware that time was of the essence, said he would give them ten minutes. The reply was, “Colonel Hewlett’s compliments to General Parsons, and is determined to defend the fort while he has a man left.”

 

Parsons knew that a frontal attack would be suicidal, so he attempted to breach the walls of the fort with cannon fire. The two sides fired at each other for about four hours with very little effect. Then Parsons, fearing that his return route to Connecticut would be cut off by British warships on the Sound, broke off the attack and headed back to Connecticut. The Patriot troops took with them a number of horses, blankets and other supplies belonging to the Loyalists.

 

The attack had failed to accomplish its main purpose, but the residents in Setauket now knew that Washington and the Continental Army had not forgotten the plight of the Patriots in enemy territory on Long Island.

QUESTIONS

Short Answer Questions

  1. Why do you think Patriot’s Rock has many cracks called striations?

  2. A plaque was placed on the rock August 1927. Why do you think the people who lived here picked this particular month and year to memorialize the Battle of Setauket?

Discussion Questions: 

  1. Why would Nathaniel Brewster preach his first sermon on the top of this rock? What was he hoping would happen?

  2. Why do you think the Patriots decided to place the canon and men by the rock in order to fire at the fort?

  3. When we drive in our community, we often look for landmarks to tell us where we are. The Native Americans used this rock as a landmark. What are some places you might see in our community that could be used as landmarks?

Submit your answers!
WORD SEARCH PUZZLES - (click images to download & print)
FD-Site-2-Word-Search.jpg
HOVER OVER TO REVEAL THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

Week 1: Setalcott Native American Village Mural

 

First Mural Scene- Setalcott Native American Village Mural

 

We don’t know all the details about life on Long Island before the Europeans came because the people living here did not leave us a written or photographic record of their lives. The Indians or Native Americans in the Setauket area were called Setalcotts. That’s where the name Setauket comes from. They were also Algonquians, a cultural group of Native Americans living along the eastern coast line of North America.

 

Vance Locke pictured a Setalcott Native American village along the shoreline of a river or stream. There are many historic details in this scene that can be observed and discussed. The Setalcotts relied on the use of local trees and plants in their daily lives. Many of the native trees and plants can be found along the nature trails in the Frank Melville Memorial Park and Sanctuary in Setauket.

2020-Site-1-Setalcott-Locke-Poster.jpg

Archaeological excavations (digs) have given us most of the details of how people in this area. We know the native people were hunters and gatherers. For thousands of years, they used natural resources - plant, wood, stone, clay and animal – for food, shelter, tools, clothes and medicine.

 

The wigwam was constructed of saplings (young trees) bent and tied with rawhide strips. This frame was covered with grass mats in the summer and with bark in the winter. An open fire could be built in the center of the wigwam as a hole was left in the top to let the smoke out. The inside was covered with deer and other animal skins.

 

Native American also had a site away from the village for manufacturing tools, spear and arrow points. Although native Long Island white quartz was the most common stone found, some flints (darker, almost black in color) from upper New York State and Connecticut were recovered indicating some trading with other native groups.

 

Second Mural Scene-Purchase of land from the Setalcott Native Americans.

 

On April 14, 1655, the Setalcotts, under the direction of Warawakmy, their Sachem (leader) and 14 other Native Americans met with the agents for the settlers and a soldier who came with them to provide protection (shown in the mural in a red coat and carrying a gun). In keeping with Native American customs they shared a meal, smoked a peace pipe and signed a deed. They sold the agents about 30 square miles of land bordering Long Island Sound, from the lands of the Nessaquogues on the west to the Mount Misery cliffs on the east (from Stony Brook to Mt. Sinai). Since money was not used by the Setalcotts, the Englishmen had to pay for the land another way. They bartered with the Setalcotts, and in exchange for their land the Setalcotts received many items, some of which are pictured in this mural.

QUESTIONS

Mural One:

1.    How many tasks can you find being done by members of the village that were needed for daily living?

Mural Two:

1. The town of Brookhaven was established in Setauket on April 14, 1655. How many years will we be celebrating this event on April 14, 2020?

2. Look at the list of items the colonists traded to the Setalcotts for the purchase of the land in Setauket. Why would the Native Americans want these items?

Submit your answers!
WORD SEARCH PUZZLES - (click images to download & print)
FD-Site-1A-Word-Search.jpg
FD-Site-1B-Word-Search.jpg
HOVER OVER TO REVEAL THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

OFFICE & GIFT SHOP HOURS

 

Currently Closed due to COVID-19 

EXHIBIT HOURS

 

Currently Closed due to COVID-19

 

ADDRESS

 

93 N. Country Road

Setauket, NY 11733

info@tvhs.org

Tel: 631-751-3730

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